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The Guardian said the following in one of his talks about his appointment as Guardian of the Faith (from Youth Can Move the World page 33) I didn’t want to be the Guardian of the Cause. [In the] first place, I didn’t think that I was worthy. Next place, I didn’t want to face these responsibilities. . . . I didn’t want to be the Guardian. I knew what it meant. I knew that my life as a human being was over. I didn’t want it and I didn’t want to face it. So . . . I left the Holy Land, and I went up into the mountains of Switzerland, and I fought with myself until I conquered myself. Then I came back and I turned myself over to God and I was the Guardian.’

‘Now, every Bahá’í in the world, every person in the world has to do exactly that same thing. Whether you are a Hand of the Cause, whether you are a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh, whether you are a member of a National Assembly, whether you are a teacher, whether you are a pioneer, whether you are an administrator, regardless of what you are, whatever you are doing in the Cause, every Bahá’í must fight with himself and conquer himself. And when he has conquered himself, then he becomes a true instrument for the service of the Cause of God—and not until that. And he will not achieve as great a success until he has done it. And this is what every Bahá’í in the world should know.”

 

Mr. Saichiro Fujita was born in 1886 in Japan and was the only Japanese bahai serving in the Holy Land (as to the best of my knowledge). He went to America in 1903 because he wanted to complete his education in America. He became a Bahai in 1905 after having come in contact with Mrs. Kathryn Frankland. The story of how he came to be a servant in the Holy Land is interesting. It all began in America when He met Abdul-Baha.

Mr Fujita met the Master in Chicago. Mr. Fujita recounts the following:

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Shoghi Effendi laid out the design of the path leading to the Shrine of Bahaullah (and its immediate surroundings) and personally overlooked the work of beautifying that section of Bahji. In so doing, he used to stand on the roof of his workroom situated just to the north of the section he was designing.

In the pilgrimage booklet it says the following about the Guardians workroom (see pictures) .

“This small building outside the quadrant of the Haram-i-Aqdas had been a utility building for Nasif Hawwa’s olive groves. The Guardian rebuilt it, fitted the roof as a place from which he could observe the developments of the gardens, furnished it with tables for his drawing and sketches and decorated its walls with maps. “

The Guardian Workroom

The Guardians Workroom in 2014

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